Dating clawfoot tub

dating clawfoot tub

How many feet are in a clawfoot tub?

This number states the length of the tub in feet. Possibilities include 4, 4 1/2, 5, 5 1/2 and 6. Several companies pioneered the manufacture of clawfoot tubs in North America: Crane, Mott, Kohler, Standard Sanitary Manufacturing -- identified by its logo SSM -- and the L. Wolf Manufacturing Company.

When did clawfoot tubs come out?

The L. Wolf Company of Chicago company produced clawfoot tubs in the late 1800s and early 1900s, as shown in a catalogue supplied by the Encyclopedia of Chicago, and its stamp is also a sign of age. Crane, Mott and Kohler tubs arent necessarily old, but they may be.

Where is the number 4 on a claw foot tub?

We purchased a claw foot tub yesterday It has a large 5 upper right, just above and to the left of Made In U.S.A. (two lines) there is a number 4. Below the number 4 is a large N.

What does it mean if a clawfoot tub is not stamped?

The absence of a stamp on a cast-iron clawfoot tub could mean its a mid-20th century generic model, but it could also mean the tub was produced before stamping became commonplace. An unstamped tub that lacks faucet drillings could have been custom-made for a well-to-do household in the mid 1800s or earlier.

What is a clawfoot tub?

One favorite among freestanding tubs is the clawfoot tub. What is a clawfoot tub? A claw foot bathtub is just what it sounds like: a freestanding tub that rests on four feet. But these tubs are so much more than just a bathtub with feet! These nostalgic tubs are the ultimate classic: they’ll never go out of style.

How much space do you need for a clawfoot tub?

Typically, a clawfoot tub is generously sized. Ensure that the tub you want will fit through all doors, halls, and stairwells to get into the bathroom, and allow for at least 3-6 inches of space on each side of the tub.

What are the different foot options for bathtubs?

Feet options have evolved to suit changing styles. In addition to the classic lion-paw or bear-claw feet found on vintage tubs, the options vary widely: modern feet, traditional feet, contemporary feet, square feet, round feet, curved feet… the choices are practically endless.

Are clawfoot baths a good idea for old houses?

While an old, clawfoot bath is a natural aesthetic choice for an old home, keep in mind that really old homes with sloping floors will result in a sloped bath. It’s easier to disguise uneven flooring with a built-in bath, which can be cut to fit (and the shoring-up covered with cladding).

What is a claw foot bathtub?

A claw foot bathtub is just what it sounds like: a freestanding tub that rests on four feet. But these tubs are so much more than just a bathtub with feet! These nostalgic tubs are the ultimate classic: they’ll never go out of style. What are the pros of a clawfoot tub? Classic style (and current trend); vintage tubs can be refurbished

How can you tell if a clawfoot tub is real?

Look for the Stamp. Modern clawfoot tubs may be made of acrylic or fiberglass, but the original ones were cast iron coated with porcelain enamel. The cast iron is exposed on the outside and bottom of the tub, and although it may have been painted, the manufacturers stamp -- if there is one -- is often clearly visible.

Do clawfoot tubs cool faster than freestanding?

Old clawfoot bathtubs are often associated with long, luxurious baths, but unless you’re OK with baths that are briefly luxurious, you may want to opt for a newer model. “Some say that the bathwater in a freestanding tub will cool faster, since it’s surrounded by air,” writes Barbara in Remodeling 101: Built-In vs. Freestanding Bathtubs.

Do acrylic clawfoot tubs come with faucets?

Some acrylic clawfoot bathtubs come with faucets and drains, but many don’t. Clawfoot Tub Filler with Hand Shower – You can get a wall mount filler if your tub is beside a wall, or a freestanding filler if it’s in open space, or you just prefer that aesthetic.

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